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also achieved science fiction immortality with his pivotal roll in the star trek episode where no man has gone before. >> ah! >> the challenge of making movies, the joy of making a masterpiece. the iconic actors who starred in one of the greatest movies of all time tonight, "up late." ♪ >>> i work with the new york philharmonic, i'm on the board of the philharmonic, and they wanted to, this year, we talked about it a year ago, they wanted to do some motion picture-related music programs. like john mocherry would do, he's doing "gone with the wind" and so forth, john williams, "star wars," we talked to him about certain program that is come in that are packaged, like a package of hitchcock films with the score already written, like a preconceived package, but the key element to this package was how can we get allen gilbert, the music director of the philharmonic to want to conduct himself, which allen is pretty pure and wants to do the classic repertory. so they said, what film? i said, it will have to be a coopert film. and i said, probably 2001, and allen agreed. they showed 2001 a
assigns in -- science in school. there ought to be some level i can engage with science and scientists. was fascinated to know not just what we know but how do we know what we know. that's particularly interesting how do we know how hot it is on the surface of the sun or where the continentings were 350 million years ago. i think it's amazing scientists can figure it out. my thinking i was going to go and look over their shoulder while they work figuring it out. when they figure them out it's not interesting at all. they are point -- doing very kind of accountant work. i had to read a lot and interview scientists when they weren't working and tell me what it is they were doing and explain to me why it was they interested were in their particular field and what was that fascinated what drew them to the particularly usually some extremely area. and i was interested in that. what made you decide to spend your whole life looking at liken or just, you know, some cluster of stars. and they were almost delighted to have somebody be interested. it was very happy experience. but i had to approa
is a professor in the political science department at liberty university of brussels seem to be going going gone to that. if over time you have a reduction in the raider purchase a patient in elections which we are seeing with european parliamentary votes then inevitably has an effect on the legitimacy of the institution of the legitimacy of its representative democracy there is effectively an enormous distance between ordinary citizens and european union. india's first of all very difficult to understand the game and political scientists who study the european union have a lot of trouble understanding the relationships between the european council and the european parliament the relationship between jose man well barroso and her man down the wrong boy the voter turnout campaign has already cost sixteen million euro zone according to representatives of the european parliament more will be spent through the end of may. some people say it's a waste of money. meanwhile the promotional posters fill the streets below is the ordinary europeans will take to heart the posters message that only they can
: we would like to find the most advanced science technology in japan and then use it to reduce air pollution in beijing. >> reporter: delegates from beijing are scheduled to visit locations such as a pollution research center, an oil refinery and a car manufacturer in their three-day visit. nhk world, tokyo. >>> japan, china and south korea work together on disaster preparedness >>> japan, china and south korea have agreed to further strengthen their cooperation in case of earthquakes, typhoons and other disasters. the deal came at a biennial ministerial meeting of disaster management officials. japan's minister said political issues exist among the three neighbors, but he said that should not affect overall ties, and they should cooperate unconditionally on disaster management. all three countries have experienced recent natural disasters. the delegates discussed their responses and signed a joint statement on future cooperation. they agreed to hold regular earthquake and typhoon drills and jointly study the causes of large scale natural disasters and response measures. the statem
. even as it boasts pulled the hitting of the case but two weeks science as the great vaults of the cross examination of indian witnesses by a puff piece on the judicial commission in connection with the tax base northeast of fort scott bought. on the proceedings were postponed. and in the robotics sources said the reckless was sent to the pockets on high commission in new delhi last week itself. as you add a bit and had plenty of off the dust in the mumbai attack was undertaken in parkson because the new c5 that attack was in talks time the finding photos of people you want it to bed attack was wasn't dark sky and the training was undertaken in pakistan. it therefore follows that ninety nine percent of the evidence in this case exists in pakistan the commission that cross examine witnesses in the lake including the back just to old record of concepts confessional statement the chief investigating officer and two doctors who conducted the autopsy all the terrorists who carried out the mumbai attacks in november two thousand and eight. this is the nation's second visit to india newport sum
to convince people that science and engineering is good to do. because they will see it writ large on the paper. there will be calls for engineers to help us go ice fishing on europa where there's an ocean of water that's been liquid for billions of years. we are going to dig through the swiss of mars and look for life. that would give me the best biologist. look at the nasa portfolio today. it's got biology, chemistry, physics, geology, aerospace engineers, mechanical engineers, electrical engineers, all the s.t.e.m. fields, science, technology, engineering and math, represented in the nasa portfolio. a healthy nasa pumps that but a healthy nasa is a flywheel that society casts for innovation. >> over the past 15 years booktv has aired over 40,000 programs about nonfiction books and authors. booktv every weekend on c-span2. >> taking a look at what's ahead this morning. aske..
a million of its artifacts. why they're still being stored here in maryland. >>> i'm mary bubala. science and technology is taking off for city middle school students. we'll show you the action coming up. >>> look at that picture right there. pleasant evening in our area weatherwise. will rain ruin halloween trick- or-treating? let's hope not. the answer in your first warning weather forecast. ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, >>> it's been a partly cloudy day. 57 degrees. the complete first warning forecast is coming up. one year after being severely damaged today, parts of ellis island reopened to the public. but it is still without nearly a million of its artifacts. they're here, nearly a hundred miles away in maryland. monique griego has more on why they aren't returned home. >> most of the artifacts were actually left unharmed. and they'll be staying here in maryland, until all of the repairs and upgrades are completed on that museum. >> these are all materials from ellis island. >> reporter: bob from hyattsville shows us aisle after aisle, of historic pieces from new york's ellis island. the facil
were a christian science and you led a corporation -- if you were christian scientist and you led a corporation, you could insist that your employees get health coverage that covers nothing? >> yeah. i mean, i think it's quite clear that the slippery slope that says that if the corporations owners, assuming that there's all of the owners are in perfect religious alignment themselves but if their religious views can sort of be imported on to this corporation and then ripple down to effect decisions about everyone who works for the corporation regardless of their religious conscience preferences, then, yeah, i think the slippery slope goes exactly the way that you pause it. and one of the things that's so strange about the janice rogers brown opinion that comes out of d.c. today is that it's almost just a given to her that corporations can have -- can be effectively people under the religious freedom act that is being invoked here. so it's almost as though, well, if they had speech rights, i guess they can have a religious conscience too. and we can talk about it like it's wacky, bu
and sciences. and the united states, the course -- because of his entrepreneurial system, because of what it teaches in the schools, specially universities, because of the ways kids grow up in the system, to look at opportunity, not a problem. to go at the answer, to work out the how to make the path were great, how to reduce the human footprint on the problem -- on the planet -- these are the things that make united states the attractive part of the work to invest in, because you can do it here. 70 are sent of all the dow r and inn united states is done the united states. right now the united states is unbeatable for that. second, the value added on resources, how is putting its money where its mouth is. we're putting 5 billion dollars against the national gas advantage that was talked about. we are putting thousands of jobs at work or at -- at work. this will create up to 2 million jobs in the next several years. a lot of that will be exporting brains and of course a little bit of iran. >> thank you, andrew. [applause] having heard from these three global business leaders, gene, i know
-time impact. >> can science prevent concussions? >> i did my job and just had to sacrifice my brain to do it. >> a senator under investigation and only al jazeera america is there. uncovering the corruption opening the files... >> are you going to resign if your're indicted? >> breaking the story real reporting, this is what we do... al jazeera america >> a new name and television drama are breathing new life in a small town in new york city. the small village of of sleepy hollow is brimming with tourists. >> the year was 1996 general motors closed down their plant. and the town decided to change their name to sleepy hollow. >> thevill village is trying tow cover from the hit and not only the tax revenue that general motors brought in. the reason to change the name to sheeplsleepily hollow was to brn people to the downtown. >> the name change was a draw. the story "the legend of sleepy hollow" flocked to the town to see where ichabod crane was memorialized th the sleepily lie town could not imagine that it could gain such a prominent place on maps as it did in september. >> probably close t
to get packing. he paid the price and is now studying computer science soon he'll be back in full a job that he would be toking to the government's thinking that i'm only buying one. i have ethical principles and try to take on vintage ago ex tigers. still what people would still have the receipt of time in states with the committee agendas. they should be trying to improve its security footage was trying to hop off the streets to greet us. the wa based on and tied it at my fix and are planning to get cca to the clinic since they didn't think to how pray tell the hurricane. but the revelations that united to a tee with it unfolds in mind that they did that but since this is that if he doesn't exactly have the best reputation of the mavens of many. what national security have become come to that sweater. even for the loss of innocent kids inside his head in the process. it's quite difficult to bite the issue of national security especially when national security since he still often infringe on basic civil liberty. all the mundane to me today about persons are fit to fly toward would jus
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of the science regardless of what's going on on the international political stage. the people here still see the united states as the great satan. they do not support the normalization of relations with america. positive comploamentic atmosphere that phone call between barack obama and hassan rouhani. >> sac capital group will pay nearly $2 million in charges. ali velshi, how significant is this fine? >> well, it's a big deal. $1.6 billion there's never been a settlement. 1.6 billion, another $6 billion in other fines. sac stands for steven a. cohen, the man who found he it for $25 million. they charge one of the highest fees in the country, average returns of 25% a year. unheard of. they once had as much as $14 billion under management. by the way these were the big investment houses. they have all pulled their money out. it is no longer allowed to manage money for pension funds endowments and wealthy people. steven cohen forbes put him at last count at $9 billion. it is a very big settlement as far as settlements go but sac was a very big company. >> ali you are looking at big economics nu
street. all of the potomac and river crossings are incident free. >>> a science fiction thriller blasts into first place. >> based on a popular novel where young geniuses are in combat. audiences say it grossed $28 million. it bumped johnny knoxville's bad grandpa into second place. las vegas debuted in third. free birds and gravity round off the top five. the dark world is poise in a huge american opening next weekend after grossing $100 million overseas this weekend. >>> howard had his earmuffs outside. that means it is cold. >> 7-day forecast, coming up next. >>> plus it is a problem younger cancer patients face. we look at how doctors and patients are working together to improve fertility rates after treatment. >>> she was the mom on everybody loves raymond, act dress doris roberts is 88. >>> ash actress loretta hot lips, is 77 today. >>> sean combs is 44. matthew mcconaghey is 44. reall the star bethany frank el is 43 and celebrity chef curtis stone is 38 today. >> have a great birthday. we < obenshain tried to outlaw. birth control pills. rape or incest. criminals, felons shows, a
. it came out in the nature geo science. it may provide more time to open cooling centers and arrange checks on elderly citizens. >>> today we learned of an american music pioneer lost. he founded the influential velvet underground. here is joe torres with more on the legend and the long walk on the wild side. >> ♪ take a walk on the wild side." >> although he was never a household name, lou reid was the rock stars' rock star. >> ♪ and my heart was beating fast ♪ >> from a middle class background in new york, reid developed an eccentric personality that turned him into a trailblazer in life and in rock music as guitarist, singer and song writer reid helped found the velvet underground. they gained little commercial success, but they were an influence and an inspiration for generations of rockers. >> there is only one great occupation that can change the world. that's real rock and roll. >> reid's work was brutally frank about his by sexuality and drug use and alcoholism. songs such as "sweet jane"," walk on the wild side" and "rock and roll." he lived on the edge and on the mar jins of
stifling heat before it arrives. it came out in the nature geo science. it may provide more time to open cooling centers and arrange checks on elderly citizens. >>> today we learned of an american music pioneer lost. he founded the influential velvet underground. here is joe torres with more on the legend and the long walk on the wild side. >> ♪ take a walk on the wild side." >> although he was never a household name, lou reid was the rock stars' rock star. >> ♪ and my heart was beating fast ♪ >> from a middle class background in new york, reid developed an eccentric personality that turned him into a trailblazer in life and in rock music as guitarist, singer and song writer reid helped found the velvet underground. they gained little commercial success, but they were an influence and an inspiration for generations of rockers. >> there is only one great occupation that can change the world. that's real rock and roll. >> reid's work was brutally frank about his by sexuality and drug use and alcoholism. songs such as "sweet jane"," walk on the wild side" and "rock and roll." he lived
need. we need a new generation, the science may be more difficult than the ones in the past. the government could thing about how to stim u lat it research, participate, help the smaller companies that want to tackle this, find the capital. when we have a problem as a society, we are not getting answers from the private sector - that's a time for the government to act. >> i know doctors and patients can help out by using antibiotics in the proper way, and not over using them. super storm sandy and the effects it still has on americans. >> we do not wanna let sandy dictate our lives., and we never will... >> surviving sandy, one year later... tomorrow 7 am - easten on al jazeera america >>> despite 12 years of the u.s.-led war on terror, radical islamist movements are active and growing around the world. fortunately the dive into islamist ideology is not always a one-way trip. this was a hip-hop loving teenager when at 16 he joined the islamist group whose goal fate. >> for 13 years of my life i considered america my enemy. i worked diligently to overthrow governments, recrui
and rebels. >>> plenty more coming for you in this news hour. including science think they found aclue to what causes alzheimer's disease. >>> and invitation to uruguay where lighting up a joint of marijuana is expected to be legalized any day now. >>> and in sports, find out how or why, the boston red sox are growing into baseball's world series. >>> first, roit police in turkey have fought with protestors outside the courthouse in ankara. shooting dead a protesto protesg thing demonstrations in june. >> since we don't have hope, we filed request on the european court of protests. >>> more from istanbul. >> hundreds of people gathered outside a courthouse in ankara. some tried to go inside the court. police fired tear gas and water cannons trying to disperse the crowd. there were several injured as a result. inside the courtroom there were also tensions, family claiming shouting that they do not trust the court will serve them any justice. now, the session was adjourned till the 2nd of december. the accused officer did not turned up, he joined the court via video conference. there are
. >> it's not rocket science, it's already happening to create successful kids and making that available for everyone. >> reporter: jennifer believes in that philosophy. >> i think one of my favorite quotes is going to be hard but it's going to be worth it. i think if they can leave here knowing that life isn't always going to be eas easy, and everyy has their own challenges, but if you try and work hard you can achieve that success. >> reporter: a lesson that is working despite the obstacle. tanya mosley, al jazeera, sea tack, washington. >> this is the adorable story of the day. while talking to thousands of people at st. peter's square pope francis made a new friend. a little boy wanted to get a closer look. so he sat in the pope's chair and would not move. when an aide tried to get the boy off stage he wrapped his arms around the pontiff's leg. pope francis continued his speech with the boy by his side. right? adorable, right? customs officials are being forced to sign confidentiality agreements after taking a look of what is on this floating barge in san francisco's bay. the reason
opportunity using science and technology to create a better understanding of landscapes than ever before. important conservation goals and achieve our development objectives together. it is not an either/or. as we seek to meet president 20,000 ohl of approving megawatts of renewable energy on public lands. it is a goal that my predecessor made huge strides in. in southern california, we are working with the state on something called the desert renewable energy conservation plan. it is an ambitious plan. we intend to understand conservation objectives. we will be blending science and satellite data and also high- priority conservation land in the mojave desert. it is interesting because i happen to know to young scientists, who both did some of their early work by counting desert tortoises. i did not know why they were counting desert tortoises until i came to this job. i came to the fish and wildlife service to understand its habitat. beyond the desert, southwest, the mojave desert, we are also going to take in approach -- an approach in alaska. we want to protect over 13 million acres.
. >> can science prevent concussions? >> i did my job and just had to sacrifice my brain to do it. on august 20th, al jazeera america introduced a new voice in journalism. >> good evening everyone, welcome to al jazeera. >> usa today says: >> ...writes the columbia journalism review. and the daily beast says: >> quality journalists once again on the air is a beautiful thing to behold. >> al jazeera america, there's more to it. ♪ >> welcome back. egypt's military government said it will end a nighttime curfew in two-week's time. it was put in place shortly after president mohamed morsi was removed from power. >>> now popular egyptian satirist had his television show suspended minutes before it was due to go on air. it did not give de trails but it's been a week since the show triggered complaints after it poked fun at military leaders. we have reports from cairo. [♪ music ] >> reporter: on the set he's talking to a vendor selling cakes and chocolates decorated with pictures of generalla gen al sisi. he was asked if he would have pictures of soccer players. he said what, you don
republican tea party. a tea party whose social is outdone by hostility, science and technology. >> what about the president's drop in approval rating and the problems with obama care. will that hurt you at all? >> what virginiaens are focused on, we have big issues, sequestration. how do we replace those jobs? how do you grow and diversify the economy? >> in northern virginia, peggy fox, wusa9. >> and turn out is expected to be light. so all the more reason both sides are pushing to get out their base. open tomorrow from 6:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. >> for the first time in 24 years, voters will have a choice in the college park mayor's race. the current mayor is being opposed by robert. he's a middle schoolteacher at george washington university. and mayor fellows house improvements along the route 1 corridor. if elected, he'll work to soften the hostility toward university of maryland students. >>> and other cities in maryland also will hold municipal elections on tuesday and among those, takoma park, which is making voting history. it is the only place in america where it is legal for teens
to you by mummies of the world. the exhibition now open at the maryland science center. >>> the family of a man who died in city police custody is demanding millions of dollars from the police department. mike schuh has the story. >> reporter: good morning. the family of 46-year-old anthony anderson witness ed police trying to apprehend him on a drug stop. police say anderson as he was being taken to the ground tried to swallow drugs. his family said he was not detained in a lawful way. they say the beating he received, according to maryland law is a wrongful death. the medical examiner declared his death a homicide but prosecutors did not press charges against the officers involved. city police have no comment on this lawsuit. i'm mike schuh reporting from police head quarters. >> thank you. >>> a masked man opened fire and killed a person on halloween. it was just before 8:00 police responded to railroad avenue. rene achila was shot and died at the hospital. police think it was a robbery. anyone with information is urged to call anne arundel county police. >>> stay with wjz 13, maryl
want to major in political science. become the mayor or something. make the situation better for other people. my name is justin, and i am your dividend. ♪ thriller thriller now ♪ take a chance >>> you can say it. that's it. yeah. you were doing this luau, something like that the last half hour. >> i just want to do the whole -- >> i used to do the whole routine king of the '80s. the whole slide. i will do it later. yes, it's a night filled with mystery, magic, lots of supervision and when it comes to halloween the more over the top probably the better. >> that's right. but making sure that the fun factor meets the fear factor does not come cheap. abc's clayton sandell shows us how this spooky season is giving a big boost to the american economy. [ screaming ] >> reporter: to some it's the sound of terror. to others, the sound of cash registers. chris stafford is what you might call a hauntrepreneur. >> are you doing that? >> yep. >> reporter: he co-owns three haunted houses in three states including denver's 13th floor, the wait to get in, four hours. >> haunted houses are coming
to a kind of interesting public boarding school that they called the governor's school for science and math. >> rose: i know about the governor's school. >> yeah and it was really cool for me because it had kids from different parts of the state and even though it seemed like that wouldn't be that much more diverse than kid just from the city it really was, kids from cities and stuff exposed to different things and it was, you know, a more advanced course work and -- >> rose: going back to the governor's school and the people that knew you then would you say he was the funniest guy in the class. >> i was pretty funny i remember there used to be from eight to ten you lived in like dorms and from eight to 10:00 you would have to stay in your room and studied and from 10:00 to 11:00 you could come down and hang out so 10:00 to 11:00 people would be congregating sitting zero berchts and tell stories and stuff like that, so, you know, i think that was kind of like, you know, i always enjoyed telling stories and things of that nature which is kind of a form of stand-up in a way so i was funny in
world number one needs a good result in china to reach the science of ending raise to dubai after a relatively poor season for him. he's made a pretty good start, shooting a 7 under par 65. to finish 2 shots clear of the field. >> yeah, it was good. you know, i played very well, controlled my ball real will for the first 12 or 13 holes. had a couple of shots coming in that i got away with, but it was nice to birdie, you know, one of the last couple. you know, great start to the tournament. and you know, right where i want to be. >>> cricket bangladesh have completed a one-day international series sweep against knew zealand, they have taken an unassailable 2-0 lead over the kiwis. the hosts reached 247. they just then dismissed the black happens for 207 to win by 41. more sport on our website check out aljazerra.com/sports. that's it, more later. >> thank you. >>> stay with us here on al jazerra, a full bulletin of news of course is state ahead at the top of the our. thank to watching al jazerra. bye for now. >>> this is al jazerra america, live from new york city i am tony harris
is a professor of political science at the university of mary washington. >> from day one it was all about how the other side was unfit to govern. and in some ways what's happening, i think, is that voters, at least some of them, are starting to agree with both campaigns. >> reporter: among them: andrea khoury. she traditionally votes republican, but says the negativity coming from both sides has left her undecided this year. >> i think they've been doing more attacking than actually what their platform is. and i think as a voter, i need to know what i'm voting for, not what i'm voting against. >> reporter: the heated rhetoric has turned off other virginians. >> i've only heard negativity. i've only heard mudslinging from both sides. >> if i vote i would write myself in on the ballot because i'm so disgusted with the way everything's been run so far. >> reporter: heading into the final weekend, polls shows mcauliffe running ahead, but with margins ranging from two to 11 points. a mcauliffe victory would bring to an end a 40-year trend in virginia politics. since 1973, the state has elected a g
for science and autism treatments. alex is hoping to beat his personal best. three hours and 23 minutes, which he said in boston. jamie just hoping to get through this race. he hadn't finished in boston when those bombs went off. he was traumatized by the chaos so today he'll be running with his ipod. but a very inspiring pair, dan and bianna. >> as you mentioned, linzie, this really is a bonding experience for the entire family. you're reminded how many stories are similar out there with the runners. >> a lot of people running today ran in boston. and this is a big comeback for people. linzie, thank you very much for that reporting. great story. >>> and coming up on "good morning america" -- harry hacked. prosecutors say that the prince's voice mail messages were illegally intercepted by british tabloids. the juicy scoops they were allegedly trying to get. we'll tell you about them coming up. >> making a lot of headlines this morning. >>> plus, they're promising that this will be an awards show unlike anything you've ever seen. what they're cooking up for the first-ever youtube music awards.
that science and engineering is good to do because they'll see it large on the paper. there will be calls for engineers to help us go eyes fishing where there is an ocean of liquid for billions of years. we're going to dig through the soils and look for life. look at the nasa portfolio today. it's got biology, chemistry, physics, aerospace engineers, electrical engineers, all the stem fields. science technology, engineering and math represented in the nasaport. a healthy nasa pump that is. it's a fly wheel that society taps for invasions. >> over the past 15 years book tv aired over 40,000 programs about non-fiction books and thors. ? what's the most important issue congress should consider in 2014? that's the question for middle and high school students in span's student video cam competition. include c-span video for your chance to twin grand prize of $5,000 and we double the number of winners and prices this year. need more information go to student cam.org. >> on thursday tennessee senator bob corker the top republican corker was addressing the ambassador to syria at this hearing. it
science professor and expert on the d.n.c. from columbia university's bernard college. a lot of people suggest that the world has blood on its hands when it comes to the congo, livingston and the belgium and the practice of slaves hands cut off. are we finally now starting to see an end to that bloody era in the d.r.c. >> i wish, but i'm afraid we are not. there is still as you can see in the reporting, there is still a lot of violence continuing and very, very little done to end the violence right now. >> this is often referred to as the forgotten conflict, 5 million people killed since 1998, millions before that. why is it forgotten? why did the world not pay attention? >> it's very differ to answer that question. as you say, it is one of the deadliest conflicts since world war ii, if not the deadliest conflict. it is the largest humanitarian crisis in the world. it has destabilized africa for 20 years. the conflict rarely makes the headlines. there is very little diplomatic engagement, very little help or assistance to the congalese people. >> the congo is the heart of africa, rich
stations. you know, from a young age. i definitely want to major in political science. become the mayor or something. make the situation better for other people. my name is justin, and i am your dividend. >> this morning we open the "world news now" vault to a day millions will never forget. >> it was on this day last year that superstorm sandy hit the east coast wiping out homes, businesses, crippling parts of the region and claiming hundreds of lives. >> surviving hurricane sandy. 50 million people are in the path of this superstorm. forecasters are warning of life-threatening flooding. >> this morning, hurricane sandy is our only story as that monster storm churns into a worst-case scenario. >> 50 million people are in harm's way. many have been heeding the warning. scrambling to get ready. boarding up their houses. buying whatever supplies they can find and fleeing their homes if they have to. >> a lot of coastal communities up and down the coast. people are told to get out. hopefully most folks have heeded those warnings. we are getting to a point where it will be too late to turn
age. i definitely want to major in political science. become the mayor or something. make the situation better for other people. my name is justin, and i am your dividend. >> i ate all of your halloween candy last night. [ crying ] >> i ate it all. ♪ i want candy ♪ i want candy >> a classic clip to set up our next segment. next to christmas, halloween is the best time of the year for kids to get good stuff. good stuff as in piles and piles of candy. >> through the years we all had our favorite. mine was anything chocolate but that nestle $100,000 bar came out. something about $100,000 that sounded cool. that was my favorite? what was yours. >> sugar daddies. no question in my mind. >> look at the boxes we got. >> to honor the annual tradition where scary and sweet come bind courtesy of candywarehouse.com we have a look at the classics. we will start in the '60s. of course, why not. take a look. you said this is your favorite box. >> to me, this is my 1970s, even though it says 1960s. this is stuff i was getting in my bag. dots. the cigars that are chewing gum. sugar da
the fa. a has moved finally to make things fit the, fit the science which, no documents problem means that you should be allowed to use them. tracy: mary, tracy byrnes. you alluded to cell phone thing. why not cell phones? other than annoyance, rudeness factor of your neighbor talking entire time what's the difference? >> because the cell phone issue is not a federal aviation administration issue. the cell phone ban is federal communications issue. it is different frequencies. for the airlines to allow these personal electronic devices they have to certify to the faa they have tested planes and they can with stand high-intensity radio frequencies. new planes can. they're built that way. this is tougher on older airlines. the cell phone is slow government agency and slow one. the fcc is even behind the faa. ashley: i'm always interested, mary, pilots themselves sitting in the cockpit nearest to the instruments were already using e-devices and using internet connections, right? >> that's right. the pilots already have an electronic flight deck, electronic flight bay. they have been issu
science fi [ male announcer ] it is more than just a new car... more than a new interior lighting system. ♪ it is more than a hot stone massage. and more than your favorite scent infused into the cabin. it is a completely new era of innovation. and the highest expression of mercedes-benz. introducing the 2014 s-class. the best or nothing. >>> good morning. looking live from the bridge at emeryville this morning, pretty clear this morning but chilly. i'm kris sanchez along with meteorologist rob mayedda. >> things are going to change by mid afternoon, a cold front, not seeing showers but a cool front gushing into the area. the wind speeds should not get quite as strong. you'll notice hour by hour, wind speeds getting up around 45 miles an hour. starting at 11:00 tonight, mostly sunny, 60s and 0s for highs today. tomorrow, a little bit cooler and we're going to be getting that extra hour of sleep. >> i was singing the happiest time of the year song around this time. >> bart workers approved a temporary contract. union leaders announced a ratification about the outcome of the vote. the un
there is a very legitimate debate over which side is more likely to win. all this is sort of art based on science. it is a little bit of both. , first of all, jennifer duffy, our senate or governor, editor. she has been doing this since 1988. i have been doing it since 1984. have seen every seat come out. what we hear from strategist, what we have from people was talked in the state, what the numbers look like. what the opposition looks like. restart a for the general assessment and these things evolve over the course of an election cycle. mcconnell oftch kentucky. the senate republican leader and the democratic side mark dreier who is seeking reelection. then you have to currently democratic seats that are leaning republican in montana and west virginia. a number of lean democratic seats held by democrats baggage another in indiana, mary landrieu in indiana. carl levin is retiring in michigan and kay hagan who is seeking reelection in north carolina. the way i start offending it up seatsre are 34 democratic that are not up this time. 31 republican. then thereabouts seven gimme putts for democrat
kelley. ♪ ♪ science and engineering escape to do because they'll see everett large on the paper. there'll be cause for engineers to help us go fishing on your robe over there is liquid for billions of years. we're going to dig through the soil to look for life. look at the nasa portfolio today. it's got biology, chemistry, physics, aerospace engineers, mechanical engineers, electrical engineers, all the stem fields. as technology, engineering and math in the nasa portfolio. nasa is a slide that society caps for innovations. >> host: kitty kelley, you write for you told us that you think philip roth is a genius. why is that? >> guest: i do think philip roth is a genius. first of all, his writing, his imagination, his mind had. the alchemy of the whole thing is some pain. i think american pastoral was a phenomenal book. i haven't read every single thing and i can hardly wait to finish what i have stacked up beside that that. it authors may. you know, if you came into the house, you would think i'm part of the collier brothers. i had "the new yorker" staff to, and newspapers. i som
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